Catrina's Garden

A place for gardeners, foodies and garden inspired artists.

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Grass – Calamagrostis Karl Foerster

Otherwise known as “Feather Reed Grass” this hardy perennial grass is a vertical powerhouse in the garden at 3 to 4 feet tall.  It draws they eye upward and breaks up a daylily garden (for example) where everything is the same height and shape.  Weather used as a specimen or to naturalize in mass, it does equally well in a boggy area as it does in dry garden soil. It is one of the first to start growing in spring and one of the first to produce seed heads. The seed heads change colors throughout the season and hold through the winter. Karl is one of the best plants for winter interest in the garden. They are sterile so you won’t get seedlings all over the place and therefor they are also great for arrangements. The way it moves in the wind is also spectacular.

$7.00
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Cup Plant – Silphium perfoliatum

cup-plant-stems1Cup Plant is a large native prairie plant that catches water at the base of its wide large leaves.  The height of its strong square stem depends on how much moisture it gets but average is 6 feet. Birds and insects enjoy the water, but those that drown are actually absorbed by the plant making it “carnivorous”.  In summer, yellow daisy like flowers are held high atop the stems and smaller clusters at the leaf margin.

$5.00
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Baptisia Tinctoria

baptesia-solar-flare1This native prairie plant is smaller than the better known blue indigo.  This is good for a landscape setting as the height is still over 2 feet with a 2 to 3 foot spread.  This plant is a member of the pea family with yellow pea like flowers.  The plant produces beneficial bacteria from its roots called rhizobia.  Baptisia blooms from late July through August and is hardy from zone 3 to 9.  The blue green foliage and black seed pods are also interesting.  This plant has been used as a dye plant and is attractive to butterflies.

$7.00

Daylily Velvet Thunder

By Benz – 1994

This variety has deep red velvety blossoms with a white wire edge that extends part way up the petals. The flowers shine with diamond dusting and are lightly ruffled with a light fragrance as a bonus. The plant is both nocturnal and extended blooming due to its thick heavy substance and the bright green throat also helps it show up in the moonlight. The plant has 28 inch scapes with 5 inch flowers. It is a mid-season blooming, dormant tetraploid.

Parentage: (Tet. Ed Murray × Matt)

$11.00
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Daylily Tiger Eye Hager

 

By Hagerstrom-Wadekamper – 1987

daylily-tiger-eye-hager-21This very large dormant tetraploid holds 8 ½ inch flowers atop 36 inch tall scapes. It is a mid-season bloomer that also has extended bloom due to its heavy substance. The plant is quite impressive in the garden. The color is rusty orange to tan with a mahogany eye-zone above a yellow/green throat.

$12.00

Daylily Ruffled Apricot

By Baker – 1972

daylily-ruffled-apricot1This fragrant, golden apricot beauty is the same color all the way down into the throat which is a little unusual. The accents are subtle; a lavender pink mid-rib that is really interesting and I love the diamond dusting. She really grabs your attention with her wide, round, ruffled blooms that are 7 inches across and held on 28 inch scapes. An early mid-season, dormant, tetraploid this daylily has nice heavy substance which is why the bloom is extended.  Sometimes the flowers even look okay the next day. She looks really nice with a lighter peach daylily.  I have her with Ming Snow. This daylily has won many awards, most notably the 1982 Stout Silver Medal award.

Parentage: (sdlg × Northbrook Star)

$12.00
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Daylily Rajah

By Stout – 1935

daylily-rajah-and-date-book1This historic daylily is a rusty orange with a red eye-zone and creamy mid-ribs above a yellow throat.  It is a mid-season re-bloomer and a dormant diploid which is fairly tall at 36 inches and sports 4 ½ inch flowers.

Parentage: (Mikado × Red sdlg)

$6.00
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Daylily Lilting Lavender

By Childs – 1973

This lavender daylily has a striking unusual form that curls and twists. The curls on this one are quite graceful rather than being crazy like some unusual forms. They tend to curl back just at the tip of the petals and the lemon yellow throat helps to get it noticed. The 8 inch flowers are held high on 30 inch scapes and have a light fragrance. A dormant diploid this plant blooms mid-season and then re-blooms.

$12.00
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Daylily Bridgeton Bishop

By Apps – 1997

Bridgeton Bishop is violet, fading to a lavender halo above a bright yellow throat. There is also a ruffled yellow picotee edge. I love this plant because of its late to very late bloom. He starts when the others are finishing. This is a dormant tetraploid that has 5 ½ inch blooms atop 28 inch scapes. The scapes generally have 3 to 4 branches with around 25 buds so this guy preforms really well once he gets going.

Parentage: (sdlg × Angel’s Smile)

$12.00

Daylily Inwood

By Stamile – 2000

This lovely dormant tetraploid sports 6 ½ inch flowers with a light fragrance on 25 inch scapes. The showy cream colored blooms have a violet plum eye and picottee above green throat.  When we say cream we want to clarify that this color is really hard to describe. There are actually pink, yellow and tan tones involved and blended in. There is also a white mid-rib that cuts through the dark eye. Inwood blooms early to mid-season and then re-blooms. The broad round petals have heavy substance and the picotee is ruffled. Heavy bloom makes this plant a winner.

Parentage:  ((sdlg x Admiral’s Braid) x (Wineberry Candy x Tet. Priscilla’s Rainbow)) x (Cherry Berry x (Cherry Berry x Royal Braid))

$11.00

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