Catrina's Garden

A place for gardeners, foodies and garden inspired artists.

Tag: Purple (Page 1 of 4)

Iris Boo

By Markham – 1971

They don’t come any cuter than Standard Dwarf Bearded (SDB) Iris “Boo”.  She doesn’t get any taller than 12 inches.  An amoena, which means that the standards are white and the falls are colored. In this case there is a crescent shaped purple spot on the falls with detailed veining and penciling near the beards, which are yellow. This cutie won the award of merit in 1976. They are early bloomers and you may want to get down close to smell the sweet fragrance.

Parentage:   Elisa Bee X Warburton 72IJ-1: ((Fairy Flax x Blue Denim) x sibling)

$5.00
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Iris Cardinal

By Bliss, 1919

At three feet, this tall bearded iris is a Dominion seedling. It has perfect form and velvety texture.  Lavender standards and rose purple falls accented with yellow beards and white penciling, make this old but really good iris one to have in your garden.  It is well branched and so it blooms for a long period. Zone 3.

$5.00
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Daylily Lilting Lavender

By Childs – 1973

This lavender daylily has a striking unusual form that curls and twists. The curls on this one are quite graceful rather than being crazy like some unusual forms. They tend to curl back just at the tip of the petals and the lemon yellow throat helps to get it noticed. The 8 inch flowers are held high on 30 inch scapes and have a light fragrance. A dormant diploid this plant blooms mid-season and then re-blooms.

$12.00
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Daylily Bridgeton Bishop

By Apps – 1997

Bridgeton Bishop is violet, fading to a lavender halo above a bright yellow throat. There is also a ruffled yellow picotee edge. I love this plant because of its late to very late bloom. He starts when the others are finishing. This is a dormant tetraploid that has 5 ½ inch blooms atop 28 inch scapes. The scapes generally have 3 to 4 branches with around 25 buds so this guy preforms really well once he gets going.

Parentage: (sdlg × Angel’s Smile)

$12.00

Daylily Inwood

By Stamile – 2000

This lovely dormant tetraploid sports 6 ½ inch flowers with a light fragrance on 25 inch scapes. The showy cream colored blooms have a violet plum eye and picottee above green throat.  When we say cream we want to clarify that this color is really hard to describe. There are actually pink, yellow and tan tones involved and blended in. There is also a white mid-rib that cuts through the dark eye. Inwood blooms early to mid-season and then re-blooms. The broad round petals have heavy substance and the picotee is ruffled. Heavy bloom makes this plant a winner.

Parentage:  ((sdlg x Admiral’s Braid) x (Wineberry Candy x Tet. Priscilla’s Rainbow)) x (Cherry Berry x (Cherry Berry x Royal Braid))

$11.00

Daylily Jan’s Twister

By Joiner – 1991

Jan’s Twister is an unusual form daylily that will really have your garden visitors stopping to say “Wow, what’s that!” She has huge peach flowers with a large green throat, that are 11 ½ inches on top of 28 inch scapes.  She could maybe be called a spider but the petals are wider at the base and they curl fold and twist in crazy directions so that no two flowers are really alike. She is an evergreen diploid that blooms early to mid-season with good re-bloom for such a large flower. Jan preforms well here in Wisconsin. This daylily won the AHS award of merit in 1997, the 2000 Lambert/Webster Award for the best Unusual Form daylily and the Lenington All American Award in 2003.  The Lenington award is for outstanding performance in diverse climates.

Parentage: (Jean Wise × Kindly Light)

$12.00
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Daylily Raspberry Pixie

By Williamson – 1969

daylily-raspberry-pixie1This is a miniature daylily growing to only 1 ½ feet with 2 ½ inch blooms.  The plant is an evergreen, diploid with fragrant fuchsia blossoms that blooms and re-blooms starting mid-season.

$5.00
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Iris Neglecta

Collected by Hornemann – 1813

This Historic TB Iris is something of an enigma. If I remember the story goes that it was originally thought to be a species I. Neglecta but some believe that it was a naturally occurring hybrid between I. variegata and I. pallida or possibly I variegata and sambucina. There are multiple species of iris growing wild around the Mediterranean and it is uncertain if they are varieties or hybrid crosses of each other.  It was first sold commercially by Biltmore Nursery Iris Catalog in 1912. This little guy has probably under gone some natural selection over the last 200 years as well because you will notice that varieties of this selection sold by different sources are often not exactlyIris Neglecta (3)1 alike. To confuse things even more the title “Neglecta” has come to be used to name a “class” of iris that have a bi-tone color pattern featuring blue and white. Characteristics that this iris should show include dark rich purple falls that are netted with white and lavender standards. The beards are yellow. By today’s standards these would most likely be considered Miniature Tall Bearded. Although they are 2.5 feet tall the flowers are smaller than modern Tall Bearded Iris. They have a delicate form that is beautiful in a light wind.

$7.00
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Iris Wabash

By Williamson – 1936, Dorothy Dietz X Cantabile.

This historic heirloom became popular in the 40’s and was one of the most popular irises of the time. A beautiful Tall Bearded Iris with snowy white standards that providing a striking contrast to the ultramarine falls finished by a white piping that brightens the margin. They have a light sweet fragrance when they bloom in early June.  Winning the Dykes Memorial medal in 1940 is what really kicked off their popularity. This extremely vigorous variety is great because it will continue to bloom even if it becomes overcrowded.  Wabash is from Indiana where the Williamson’s owned the Longfield Iris Farm, in Bulffton Indiana. This Iris is named after the Wabash River and there is a town of the same name. The river was named for the Indian name Wa-ba-shi-ki which means “bright white”. The Iris farm closed in the late 1950’s, but if you are in Indiana be sure to see the Williamson/Cook Memorial Iris garden.

Bright Hour looks a lot like Wabash, but does not have the reddish purple flushing of the foliage at the base.

$6.00
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Siberian Iris Caesar’s Brother

Iris Siberian Caesar's Brother

Iris Siberian Caesar’s Brother

Siberian Iris are very hardy (zone 3). This one is deep purple and blooms in early June here in Wisconsin. It gets about 3 feet tall and can form large clumps up to 3 feet across. When the clumps get large enough that they start dyeing out in the middle just do some transplants. They are very tough and can take most conditions including poor dry soil and even boggy conditions, but will do best in moist soil and full sun.  Siberian Iris attracts butterflies and they are not favored by deer and rabbits.  There are no bugs or disease to worry about with these plants and they remain attractive well into fall and winter.  Just cut them down in spring.

$4.00
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