Catrina's Garden

A place for gardeners, foodies and garden inspired artists.

Tag: Dark

Sedum Dragon’s Blood

Dragon’s Blood Sedum is a rapidly growing, zero maintenance ground cover. It forms a dense mat about 5” tall, of fleshy foliage that is green purple in summer and develop a brighter red purple color in cooler weather. The color is also brighter in full sun though the plant will grow in light shade. Foliage holds its beauty far into fall and early winter here in Wisconsin.

The flowers are a brilliant hot pink in summer. The only thing I do to this plant is to remove the dried flower stems when they are done, but this is not necessary for the health of the plant.

These plants will stand up to whatever nature can dish out from heat and drought to extreme cold and humidity. They don’t bat an eye about poor soil, but will be bigger and even more fleshy I better fertility is provided. They also do fine in containers and will spill over the edge. This is one of the only perennials that will survive the winter in a container here in Wisconsin.

The plant is in the middle left of this picture.

$3.00
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Penstemon Digitalis – Huskers Red

Penstemon 'Husker's Red'

Penstemon ‘Husker’s Red’

Commonly called Beardtongue, this native plant is a perennial that is fully hardy to zone 3.  Mature plants can be 2 feet tall and a foot and a half across. The shiny leaves are dark green/maroon and the undersides fully colored maroon as are the stems and flower stalks. It holds its color long into fall after most things have gone dormant.  The beautiful upright stems of lipped tubular flowers are white to very light pink, and blooms in April to June and then re-bloom until frost if cut back. The white flowers have high contrast with the foliage so the plant is ideal for the moon garden.  The plant has the best foliage color and blooms best I full sun but it can take some shade.  It’s super easy to care for, just remove old foliage in spring and cuto ffe sed heads in fall if you don’t want self-sowing.  It has many other benefits including being deer resistant, drought tolerant once established and attractive to bees, birds and butterflies.  Being the Perennial Plant Association Plant of the Year in 1996 is what brought this plant into the public eye and into our gardens.  Penstemon means five stamens in Greek.

$6.00
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Ligularia the Rocket

Ligularia stenocephala – The Rocket; Commonly called Senco or Leopard plant.  This is a stately, noble specimen plant with huge leathery leaves. Give this moisture lover room as it can reach heights of 5 feet and easily 5 feet across. The leaves are serrated and deep green on top, with dark maroon/ green on the reverse side and on the stems. We use these huge leaves for making leaf castings.  Tall spikes of golden yellow flowers start to climb above the foliage in mid to late summer and are a hummingbird favorite. The plant produces a large number of seeds, but don’t worry, you will not have a million seedlings; the plant is sterile.  The plant will do well in part sun to mostly shade and is hardy here in northern WI (zone 4). Ligularia will live in most soils but prefers a rich moist soil. It will tolerate an overly moist soil, but not too much humidity. If the soil is too dry the plant will droop rather than die and in that case will need supplemental watering.  There is a light sweet fragrance and the name means sweet smelling roots in Japanese which is where the species is  from.

$8.00
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Ligularia Dentata Desdemona

This gorgeous specimen plant is brilliant in the back of a shady border or at the ponds edge and hardy to zone 3. They get 3 feet tall with a 4 foot spread and heart shaped leaves that can be a foot across.  The foliage emerges burgundy with the leaves turning dark green on the top side, but holding their burgundy color on the underside and stems.  Golden to orange/yellow daisy like flowers emerge in July.  Likes wet soil and will benefit from part to full shade; but really this architectural beauty is quite easy and will do fine in nearly any conditions.  The will take some sun and do fine with less than optimal water.

$8.00
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Daylily Strutter’s Ball

By Moldovan – 1984

Daylily Strutter's Ball

Daylily Strutter’s Ball

This black-purple beauty opens a multitude of wide 6 inch flowers on a 30 inch tall plant.  It is a mid-season bloomer that just keeps going and going due to a very heavy bud set, and the fact that it is a vigorous dormant tetraploid.

$8.00
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Daylily Salieri

By Moldovan 1990

Daylily Salieri

Daylily Salieri

30″ ht.5″ flowers – zone 3
Very dark purple with a darker eye zone.
Dormant, tetraploid
Early with extended bloom.
Not the darkest of the darks, but one of the most reliable bloomers.

$8.00

Daylily Licorice Bit

By Roberson – 1989

This 18” miniature daylily has larger flowers for a miniature at about 3”.  They are very dark red/purple with a glowing golden eye and a slightly ruffled edge. This color is hard to capture in a photograph and I would say that it is a little darker than shown here. It is an evergreen diploid so it does grow a little slower than the dormant daylilies here in the north but has survived many years and the foliage looks fine here in Wisconsin.

$7.00
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Daylily Catherine Neal

By Carpenter – 1981

Daylily Catherine Neal

Daylily Catherine Neal

A perfectly formed round flower with a ruffled edge is stunning in deep plum purple.  It is a mid to late season bloomer that is a dormant diploid.  At 30” with a 6” flower this plant starts late but them blooms into the night and the lime green throat blending to white before hitting the darkness really makes it stand out in the dark.

$7.00

Daylily Black Friar

By Lester – 1950

Daylily Black Friar

Daylily Black Friar

2.5 feet tall with a 4 inch bloom. This very dark velvety wine red-purple flower is a dormant diploid.  The chartreuse throat provides a bright contrast. This is a historic daylily that can be difficult to find.

$8.00

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