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Daylily Valley Monster

By L.K. Powell – 1983

This 33 inch tall dormant, tetraploid has a big, yellow, 9 inch flower.  It is a mid-season bloomer that reblooms in the late season.  It’s not registered as such but it does have a red blush on the ends of the petals that blends inwards, and has a bright green throat.  The cinnamon blush can be darker or more pale and sometimes the petals curl back so much that you may not notice it unless you view it from the side.

Parentage:  Monster x Hudson Valley

  $15.00

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Daylily Eruption

By Wild, 1981

Look closely at this one to see it’s real beauty. It is an oldie but a goodie. At first it appears to be a bright fire engine red, 6.5 inch bloom with a gold throat but in the right light and when you get closer you will see the magenta veins and halo. This 30 inch dormant, diploid blooms mid-season and into the late season.

$14.00

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Daylily Autumn Minaret

By Stout – 1951

This stately, historic daylily is 66 inches tall and has a 3 inch trumpet shaped flower that is golden yellow with a rusty orange eye zone. It is a mid-season/late bloomer; one of the latest in my garden, and it also blooms into the night. A dormant, diploid, it is also supposed to be fragrant and it has nice st

 

rong stems to support bunches of little flowers dancing well above the near by plants.

Parentage:  H. altissima x H. fulva

    $19.00

Daylily Springfield Clan

By Trimmer 2001

This is a “Wow Plant”.  It’s got a huge 10 inch bright crimson red flower with a wide golden throat that turns green deep inside.  It’s tall at 40 inches but won’t tip over even with a but count of 25.  He starts blooming in the early to mid-season but then reblooms.  Classified as a cascading unusual form, it is a semi-evergreen, but seems to fine here in northern Wisc

onsin.  Huge and spectacular!

Parentage: Persian Ruby × Point of View

  $20.00

Daylily Shola

By Hankins 1973

 

Shola is a 28 inch tall dormant tetraploid with extended bloom.  It is red orange or “copper” and opens to 8 inches.  The golden highlights include a fine yellow edge, prominent midribs and a golden throat.  It is a really good grower like it’s parent Mary Todd.

Parentage: (Mary Todd × (Tet. May Hall × Buddy))

$12.00

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Daylily Prairie Moonlight

By Marsh; 1965

Huge 8″ bloom, 34″ tall, Mid Season.  If you are looking for something big, here it is! Pale yellow blooms are 8″ across and abundant. Makes a mass of color and is one of the favorites our garden visitors.  This color is great for the moon garden as it seems to glow in the dark, and it is fragrant.  Semi-Evergreen, diploid.

  $11.00

Daylily Fire Fountain

By Bremer – 2011

Wow, this plant is truly huge,  At 60 inches tall (152 cm) with 8.5 inch blooms (22 cm) it is really impressive. It is brilliant red above a large star shaped yellow throat. Stamens that are also bright red and a light ruffle set it off. A super hardy dormant, tetraploid that blooms mid season also keeps going and going well into fall with a bud count of 23 on 5 nicely branched branches.  Fertile both ways; this means lots of fun for those that have the space for giant seedlings.

Parentage:  (Ravenous × Springfield Clan) × B.J. McMillen

$65.00

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Daylily Delta Force

By Gossard 2004

Delta force is a big tough plant.  It’s 38 inches  tall with an 8.5 inch bloom.  A fairly early bloomer it is a dormant, tetraploid with 22 buds on four branches.  It is classified as unusual form; it is sometimes wide open and sometimes pinched or twisted.  The flowers are a handsome dark rosey purple with a darker plum purple eye above a green throat.

Parentage: Heavenly Island Magic × (Moonlit Masquerade × Boney Maroney)

$15.00

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Aster New England – Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae, commonly called New England aster, is a native perennial which is most often found in moist prairies in the eastern half of the US.  It is hardy to zone 4 and heat tolerant to zone 8, and although it is large and needs some space it is not invasive and does fine in the garden.  It grows to 3 to 6 feet and spreads to 2 to 4 feet.  Plant more than one for a real show.  The size depends on the moisture provided and the strain that you have.  Pinching back in July will keep it shorter and delay flowering.  Daisy type flowers with purple rays and yellow centers that are about an inch wide, appear in in abundance in late August and September.  The plant likes full sun and is loved by bees and butterflies. Cut back to the ground in fall to avoid seedlings. The genus name comes from the Greek symph, meaning coming together, and trich, meaning hair; in possible reference to the flower anthers.

$8.00

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Hosta Yellow River

By Eric Smith/Paul Aden/Pete Ruh – 1993

This hosta will form a magnificent clump given time. Reaching 20 inches tall the 13 x 10 inch leaves are topped with 48 inch scapes that have white flowers. The spectacular dark green foliage has a wide yellow margin that develops a more creamy white appearance as the summer heat moves in.  Light shade will keep it looking nice. The leaves are cordate, ribbed and have wavy margins. This Montana sport can reach 4 feet across and, having an upright habit, the long pointed leaves with good substance are stunning.

$12.00

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