Catrina's Garden

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Tag: Large Size (Page 1 of 2)

Grass – Calamagrostis Karl Foerster

Otherwise known as “Feather Reed Grass” this hardy perennial grass is a vertical powerhouse in the garden at 3 to 4 feet tall.  It draws they eye upward and breaks up a daylily garden (for example) where everything is the same height and shape.  Weather used as a specimen or to naturalize in mass, it does equally well in a boggy area as it does in dry garden soil. It is one of the first to start growing in spring and one of the first to produce seed heads. The seed heads change colors throughout the season and hold through the winter. Karl is one of the best plants for winter interest in the garden. They are sterile so you won’t get seedlings all over the place and therefor they are also great for arrangements. The way it moves in the wind is also spectacular.

$7.00
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Cup Plant – Silphium perfoliatum

cup-plant-stems1Cup Plant is a large native prairie plant that catches water at the base of its wide large leaves.  The height of its strong square stem depends on how much moisture it gets but average is 6 feet. Birds and insects enjoy the water, but those that drown are actually absorbed by the plant making it “carnivorous”.  In summer, yellow daisy like flowers are held high atop the stems and smaller clusters at the leaf margin.

$5.00
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Baptisia Tinctoria

baptesia-solar-flare1This native prairie plant is smaller than the better known blue indigo.  This is good for a landscape setting as the height is still over 2 feet with a 2 to 3 foot spread.  This plant is a member of the pea family with yellow pea like flowers.  The plant produces beneficial bacteria from its roots called rhizobia.  Baptisia blooms from late July through August and is hardy from zone 3 to 9.  The blue green foliage and black seed pods are also interesting.  This plant has been used as a dye plant and is attractive to butterflies.

$7.00

Rudbeckia Triloba – Brown Eyed Susan

Rudbeckia-Triloba

Rudbeckia-Triloba

This native plant is 3-4 feet tall and a branched form can make it equally as wide. The fuzzy, dark green, three lobed leaves make it deer resistant. It prefers moisture but will do fine in any condition including drought when established. The plant self-sows easily and flowers in the second year so don’t worry that they are considered a short lived perennial. These plants seem to “move around” in your garden. The first year it is a mound of basal foliage and the next year a mass of 1-2 inch bright yellow flowers with contrasting dark brown centers. They bloom from midsummer into hard frost. It plays well with native grasses and is a great cut flower.

$4.00
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Hosta Wide Brim

Paul Aden 1979

Wide Brim has a bright grass green center with a wide irregular cream to yellow margin which holds throughout the season. Round, cordate leaves are 8″ long x 6” wide with 11 veins.

A rapid grower, it is low and wide, with great color and texture. Wide Brim is bound to be a standout in any planting. Because it doesn’t get very tall, it goes well in front of the larger blue hostas.

Forms a wide 3 foot clump but only 1.5 feet tall. The scape is foliated and very thick and has a double twist (twisting one revolution every 3-5 inches) sporting two stalks of flowers higher up on the scape. Pale lavender flowers bloom in July.

$6.00

Hosta Striptease

C & R Thompson 1991

Striptease is an unusual H. ‘Gold Standard’ mutation, a very dark green leaf where the green is actually a very wide margin. The center is a thin strip of gold with a unique strip of white that surrounds the gold center. The white band is sometimes not seen until the plant become mature. The satiny heart shaped leaves are about 5” x 6”.

The vigorous growing 2.5′ wide 2’ tall clump is topped with fragrant violet flowers on 2′ scapes in July.

1997 Nancy Minks Award winner. 2005 Hosta of the Year

$8.00
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Hosta Silver Crown

AHS – 1987

This hosta is one of the standbys of the Hosta world and much mystery surrounds the history of this plant.  Many millions of people have it in their gardens so naturally regional variations exist and then are moved around the world. I believe this to be the most “shared” plant of all time. Back in the 21st century these were among the first hostas available and many plants were said to be part of the species “fortune”, but were actually unrelated.  This group of green cultivars and variegated sports has now been renamed as multiple different cultivars.  To add to the confusion these plants have been sold under a variety of different names over the years, some “correct” and some not. Most of the sports are protégé of “Fortunei Hyacinthina”. There were so many of the similar looking and sometimes unrelated sports with white margines that eventually they were sort of grouped together under the name of “Fortunei Albomarginata” or “Silver Crown”.

Dark to medium- green, ovate, leaves, usually about 10 x 7” have an irregular wide white margin. This plant grows extremely fast and so is great for massing.  You often see them alternating with dark hostas. Mature plants form draping mounds 2 feet wide by 1 ½ feet tall that can take a half day of sun.

$5.00
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Hosta September Sun

Bob Solberg 1985

September sun is a sport of ‘August Moon’ selected by James Massey.

The leaves are gold with dark green margin. There is a high contrast between margin and center and the color grows more pronounced as the season progresses. The round to heart shaped leaves are heavily corrugated and stand up to slugs due to their excellent substance. They are 6” x 7” and have 8 veins.

Near white flowers bloom in late summer on 3 foot spikes.

This erect mound is 3 feet across by 1.5 feet tall. The plant is a really good grower when given some morning sun.

$8.00
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Hosta Regal splendor

By Walters Gardens – 1987

Regal Splendor is a majestic variegated sport of Krossa Regal and also has the signature feature of the upright vase shaped form. It was the hosta of the year in 2003 and is large at about 3 feet wide and 3 feet tall with 12 x 7 inch leaves. The frosty blue-green leaves are cordate and have an undulating, irregular, white to creamy yellow margin that can take a little sun without burning due to heavy texture. This stately plant is topped with lavender flowers on 4 foot scapes in late July.

$12.00

Hosta Paul’s Glory

Paul Hofer/Pete Ruh 1987

Paul’s Glory is a mutation from H. ‘Perry’s True Blue’; from the sieboldiana line.

The large brilliant gold centered, heart shaped leaves have a ½” blue margin and are nicely puckered when mature. The centers turn white as the season progresses. The 7” x 5” leaves have 8 veins and the heavy substance helps them stand up to slugs.

Paul’s Glory holds its lovely variegated color all season although the colors do seem to change with the seasons and also depending on what light you have it in. So much so that at times it can look like 2 different hostas.

The lavender flowers, starting in June, also seem to change and can sometimes be near white. A Mature clump can be 2.5 feet by 1.5 tall with 2 foot scapes.

Give this one a prominent spot so it can grab attention. It will tolerate a little morning sun.

$7.00
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