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Tag: Fragrant Page 1 of 3

Daylily Heavenly Curls

By Gossard – 2000

This creamy white spider/unusual form daylily twists and turns in all directions because it is both crispate, cascading and spatulate. It is a dormant, diploid that is 27 inches tall with a 7 inch bloom and bud count; 12 buds on 2 branches. It is a mid-season bloomer. The bright green throat draws the eye to it and then the rest of it makes the observer say “wow!” Because they have species H. Citrina in their background they will have characteristics like vigor, fragrance and a nocturnal opening. They will open during the night and then last the whole next day.

Parentage: Mormon Spider x Frozen Mert

$14.00

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Daylily Autumn Minaret

By Stout – 1951

This stately, historic daylily is 66 inches tall and has a 3 inch trumpet shaped flower that is golden yellow with a rusty orange eye zone. It is a mid-season/late bloomer; one of the latest in my garden, and it also blooms into the night. A dormant, diploid, it is also supposed to be fragrant and it has nice st

 

rong stems to support bunches of little flowers dancing well above the near by plants.

Parentage:  H. altissima x H. fulva

    $19.00

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Daylily Arnold’s Daughter

By Korth – 2006

This blue eyed beauty has a nic

ely ruffled cream self with a blended band around the eye that varies from lavender to rose ormagenta and a violet edge. The green throat really stands out next to that blue violet eye. The 5.75 inch flowers are held on 34 inch scapes (32 buds on 6 branches). This dormant, tetraploid is also fragrant.

Parents:  Destined to See × Arnold Raeker

$20.00

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Daylily Love You

By Webster 1984

Love you is a very pale pink, near white in color, with lightly ruffled edges and a cream colored mid rib.  What makes it a standout is the intense green throat that spreads into a chartreuse halo.  The plant is a dormant tetraploid.  It blooms mid-season and is very fragrant.  On a side note; there are many daylilies with Love You in the name that are different than this plant.  Love You is a good one for the moon garden.

$12.00

Iris Boo

By Markham – 1971

They don’t come any cuter than Standard Dwarf Bearded (SDB) Iris “Boo”.  She doesn’t get any taller than 12 inches.  An amoena, which means that the standards are white and the falls are colored. In this case there is a crescent shaped purple spot on the falls with detailed veining and penciling near the beards, which are yellow. This cutie won the award of merit in 1976. They are early bloomers and you may want to get down close to smell the sweet fragrance.

Parentage:   Elisa Bee X Warburton 72IJ-1: ((Fairy Flax x Blue Denim) x sibling)

$5.00

Iris Blue Denim

By Warburton – 1958

I just love the color of this historic Standard Dwarf Bearded (SDB) Iris. It’s a true sky blue, the ruffled falls and standards are the same color but there is noticeable darker blue veining throughout and a yellow beard for accent.  This Iris pumila is about 12 inches tall and is great for the rock garden or front of the border.

Parentage:  ‘Great Lakes ‘ X ( ‘April Morn’ x unknown)

$5.00

 

Daylily Velvet Thunder

By Benz – 1994

This variety has deep red velvety blossoms with a white wire edge that extends part way up the petals. The flowers shine with diamond dusting and are lightly ruffled with a light fragrance as a bonus. The plant is both nocturnal and extended blooming due to its thick heavy substance and the bright green throat also helps it show up in the moonlight. The plant has 28 inch scapes with 5 inch flowers. It is a mid-season blooming, dormant tetraploid.

Parentage: (Tet. Ed Murray × Matt)

$11.00

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Daylily Ruffled Apricot

By Baker – 1972

daylily-ruffled-apricot1This fragrant, golden apricot beauty is the same color all the way down into the throat which is a little unusual. The accents are subtle; a lavender pink mid-rib that is really interesting, and I love the diamond dusting. She really grabs your attention with her wide, round, ruffled blooms that are 7 inches across and held on 28 inch scapes. An early mid-season, dormant, tetraploid; this daylily has nice heavy substance which is why the bloom is extended.  Sometimes the flowers even look okay the next day. She looks really nice with a lighter peach daylily.  I have her with Ming Snow. This daylily has won many awards, most notably the 1982 Stout Silver Medal award.

Parentage: (sdlg × Northbrook Star)

$12.00

Daylily Lilting Lavender

By Childs – 1973

This lavender daylily has a striking unusual form that curls and twists. The curls on this one are quite graceful rather than being crazy like some unusual forms. They tend to curl back just at the tip of the petals and the lemon yellow throat helps to get it noticed. The 8 inch flowers are held high on 30 inch scapes and have a light fragrance. A dormant diploid this plant blooms mid-season and then re-blooms.

$12.00

Daylily Final Touch

By Apps 1991

Final Touch is a late blooming (get it? Final Touch?), slightly fragrant dormant diploid. It is a bi-colored pink panther pink with the lower petals being lighter pink and it has a bright gold throat. It is winner of the Eugene S. Foster Award. Many years it re-blooms until frost.

$8.00

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